p1
p2
p3
p4
p5
p6

Find out the answers to all your questions

In CONGEN we help you solving your doubts about your disease

Genetic counseling involves a process of communication with families and patients as well as with specialists to help them understand the genetic aspects associated with a certain disease.

This process integrates not only the diagnosis and evaluation of the risks of a genetic disease, but also education on inheritance and genetic tests, the management and prevention of the disease as well as helping individuals to obtain resources and information updated at every moment.

Genetic counseling is a communication process in which a professional:

  • …offers specific information to understand the genetic inheritance and how it contributes to the appearance of certain diseases or affects the risk of suffering others.

  • …analyzes clinical and genetic information to estimate the risks of recurrence in specific patients.

  • …helps to understand the medical aspects of a genetic disease, from diagnosis, through the probable trajectory of the disorder to treatment and possible improvements in the quality of life.

  • …provides information on the appropriate genetic tests for each case depending on the risk and reproductive goals.

  • …helps to make the appropriate decision for each patient taking into account their genetic risk and family goals without forgetting their ethical and religious beliefs.

  • …provides the patient and their relatives at risk of recurrence with all the resources that can help with the management of the disease.

It is advisable to ask for genetic counseling if …

  • … you are over 35 and you want to have a baby

  • … you have a family history of genetic diseases, congenital anomalies and / or mental retardation

  • … you have a child with a genetic disease or congenital anomaly

  • … you have had several consecutive abortions or difficulty in getting pregnant

  • … you plan to have a baby and want to know the potential risks

  • … you wait for a baby and the results of some test (ultrasound, amniocentesis, etc.) have been abnormal

  • … you want to know your risk to suffer cancer, Alzheimer’s or heart disease

Prepare for your next visit!
  1. Talk to your relatives (son, daughter, siblings, father, mother, grandparents, aunts, ancles, and cousins) and ask about their health

  2. Try to get the clinical history of affected family members with a genetic disease

  3. Gather the results of the tests you have done to diagnose your disease

  4. Check with your insurance if it covers this service and what genetic tests are covered

What should you bring to your visit ?:

  • Family history

  • Your medical results

  • Your questions

  • Your partner, a relative or a friend (optional)

Genetic counseling is a communication process in which a professional:
  • …offers specific information to understand the genetic inheritance and how it contributes to the appearance of certain diseases or affects the risk of suffering others.

  • …analyzes clinical and genetic information to estimate the risks of recurrence in specific patients.

  • …helps to understand the medical aspects of a genetic disease, from diagnosis, through the probable trajectory of the disorder to treatment and possible improvements in the quality of life.

  • …provides information on the appropriate genetic tests for each case depending on the risk and reproductive goals.

  • …helps to make the appropriate decision for each patient taking into account their genetic risk and family goals without forgetting their ethical and religious beliefs.

  • …provides the patient and their relatives at risk of recurrence with all the resources that can help with the management of the disease.

What is a genetic test?

A genetic test is a type of molecular diagnosis that can detect changes in your DNA that cause a genetic disease or increase your risk of suffering a future disease.

How is a genetic test done?

  • A biological sample is necessary: ​​saliva or oral tissue, blood and, rarely, a biopsy

  • Your sample will be sent to the laboratory where different techniques, depending on the gene of interest, will be carried out to detect possible mutations in your DNA.

  • The results will be communicated in the consultation, where the personal and family implications of the same will be discussed and sent in writing to the patient, and if necessary to the specialist.

  • Presymptomatic tests: are performed in asymptomatic individuals to confirm or exclude the presence of a genetic variant that causes a possible future disease.

  • Diagnostic tests: are used to confirm or exclude a genetic disorder in a symptomatic individual or, prenatally, to estimate the risk of the fetus suffering a genetic disease.

  • Predictive tests: are performed to a relative or a population in which there is a greater risk than in the general population of suffering from a genetic disease, either because there is a family history or because they belong to a high-risk group.

  • Prognostic tests: are used to predict the possible course of a disease or the capacity for recovery.

  • Carrier tests: are performed in asymptomatic individuals to assess the risk of being carriers of a mutation that can be transmitted to the offspring.

  • Pharmacogenetic tests: are used to identify possible interactions of certain drugs due to the specific genetic information of the individual.

Reasons to perform a genetic test:

  • Search: there are genetic tests that seek in your DNA the predisposition to suffer certain types of diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer’s.

  • Prevention: if you discover that you are at high risk for a genetic disease, you can change your lifestyle to reduce your risk.

  • Early detection: there are diagnostic tests (such as colonoscopies or mammograms) that can be performed more frequently for detection of the first symptoms of a disease if the genetic tests indicate that there is a greater predisposition than the average to suffer a certain disease.

  • Personalized treatment: certain people respond better to different treatments for the same disease. By studying your DNA we can discover what would be the most effective treatment for you.

  • Family implications: your genetic information can also reveal data about your close relatives, offering the possibility of genetic testing if necessary.

If we can not diagnose your illness …

  • Your data will continue to be included in our database to carry out periodic follow-ups that help us with a future diagnosis.

  • We will keep you informed about the advances in research.

  • We will help you get in touch with other specialists in the search for your diagnosis.